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DavidLeR

Sale of Goods Act and "Repair Only" Non-Return Policy

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The question is: do other stores share Crappy Tire’s despicable “repair only” policy, which means the poor consumer has zero time to return a defective product, and must instead deal with a warranty claim?

(This is the notorious policy that attempts to side-step the consumer protection laws of Ontario, BC, and so on. Or, in the words of one owner, “too-bad-so-sad”.)

Here are some links to web sites:

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Home Depot "Return Policy | Home Depot Canada"

“Returns with an Original Sales Receipt Within 90 Days of Purchase …Any purchase made by credit card will be refunded to the original credit card (and so on, for various forms of payment).

No mention of a "repair only" policy, or a “too-bad-so-sad” policy on defective items. It doesn’t work? Bring it back.

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Rona: "Rona.ca - Cancellation and Return Conditions"

"You may return merchandise within 30 days following purchase by dropping it off at a RONA store.”

Also, "if the merchandise was damaged or defective at the time of delivery, or if the merchandise is not what you ordered, RONA inc. will reimburse you both merchandise and shipping costs."

There is no mention of a flat-out refusal to take back defective items or a “repair only" policy.

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Lowe's Canada: "Returns and Refunds Policy brought to you by Lowes.com"

"If you receive an item you are dissatisfied with, you may return it within ninety (90) days to any Lowe's store for a refund or exchange within our current return policy guidelines."

No mention of a "repair only" policy, or anything like it. It’s defective? Bring it back!

Home Hardware (with an “e”)

- Did Crappy Time “invent” the devious and illegal (i.e., contrary to Consumer Protection laws) "repair only" policy? Maybe I'm giving them too much credit for creativity, but I don’t see anybody else trying to pull this off. Certainly the "invented" it in the sense that it's not allowed in certain jurisdictions. So, based on all available evidence, I’d have to say “Yes”.

- Should you shop at Crappy Tire, and pray to God that the item you just picked isn’t one of the defective ones? Absolutely not!

- Should you automatically cave in to the whims of the greedy store owners, who want you to “shouldered the burden of bad products”, because that's “the cost of [the customer's] education”? ( See posting #9). No!
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  1. Ramou's Avatar
    i believe the Quebec Consumer Protection Act mandates that "goods be fit for the purposes for which they are meant to be used". If the goods are defective, the contract is void and the retailer must refund. Of course, no one is going to sue CT over a small purchase, but they can report dishonest practices to the OPC. Office de la Protection du Consommateur Certainly the situation in other Provinces is similar?