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Thread: Collecting ID and Personal Information

  1. #1

    Collecting ID and Personal Information

    A common topic of discussion is CT's practice of requesting and recording personal information, before processing a return.

    The official web site on Returns, Refunds & Exchanges (Returns, Refunds & Exchanges | Canadian Tire) states:

    "Your name, residence address and phone number will be required. This information is collected, used and retained to help prevent fraud, and may only be disclosed within Canadian Tire. Valid photo ID may be required to confirm this information."

    So, according to their own policy, they are only supposed to "collect" (i.e., record):
    - Your name.
    - Your address.
    - Your home telephone number.

    Although you may be "required" by CT to show photo ID (like a driver's license), they are not supposed to collect/record anything from the license (or other photo ID).

    There has been some comments on whether or not even the above is really allowed.

    Here's a post from the "Return Policy" thread:

    Return policy

    PIPA is Personal Information Protection Act

    "Under PIPA, an organization may not:
    ■ refuse to supply you with a product or service because
    you do not consent to the collection, use or disclosure
    of your personal information for purposes that are not
    necessary for the transaction"

    Processing a return is a "service".

    Personal identification is not "necessary" for the transaction, and neither is a receipt. Those are just things that Canadian Tire would prefer to have.

    There have also been routine reports that store staff are recording information from driver's licenses or other ID, which is against CT's own written policy.

  2. #2
    Posted by an unregistered user Angry CT Guy's Avatar
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    Re: Collecting ID and Personal Information

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    A common topic of discussion is CT's practice of requesting and recording personal information, before processing a return.

    The official web site on Returns, Refunds & Exchanges (Returns, Refunds & Exchanges | Canadian Tire) states:

    "Your name, residence address and phone number will be required. This information is collected, used and retained to help prevent fraud, and may only be disclosed within Canadian Tire. Valid photo ID may be required to confirm this information."

    So, according to their own policy, they are only supposed to "collect" (i.e., record):
    - Your name.
    - Your address.
    - Your home telephone number.

    Although you may be "required" by CT to show photo ID (like a driver's license), they are not supposed to collect/record anything from the license (or other photo ID).

    There has been some comments on whether or not even the above is really allowed.

    Here's a post from the "Return Policy" thread:

    Return policy

    PIPA is Personal Information Protection Act

    "Under PIPA, an organization may not:
    ■ refuse to supply you with a product or service because
    you do not consent to the collection, use or disclosure
    of your personal information for purposes that are not
    necessary for the transaction"

    Processing a return is a "service".

    Personal identification is not "necessary" for the transaction, and neither is a receipt. Those are just things that Canadian Tire would prefer to have.

    There have also been routine reports that store staff are recording information from driver's licenses or other ID, which is against CT's own written policy.
    Cashing a cheque is a service....you going to try and open an account without ID?
    The people on here just get more ridiculous and stupid each day.
    And by the way, when YOU get to make the rules for businesses, let me know. Loser!

  3. #3

    Re: Collecting ID and Personal Information

    For opening an account, there are money laundering laws and revenue laws that apply. So, yeah, in that case, the bank is unable to open my account unless I can identify myself. Pretty reasonable, if you think about it for 5 seconds.

    Oh, and for cheques? I deposit cheques into my own account all the time - I don't need to provide ID each tiem. Pretty reasonable, if you think about it. So, no, that example doesn't really work.

    (Unless I go to a cashing service, and have to prove that I'm the one the cheque is made out to - again, all reasonable.)

    But I'm glad that the CT reps are confirming that providing a refund or exchange is a service. That's a step in the right direction.

    And since CT doesn't need ID in order to provide that service (all they need to do is hand over the money!), then CT can't refuse to provide that service, just because a consumer doesn't provide ID.

    Of course, CT might not LIKE having to give people a refund without them showing ID. But too bad for CT- they can't just continue to ignore the laws.

    Thanks for confiming that, CT person!

    And, hey, nobody said consumers get to make the 'rules' for businesses. That's the role of government.

    Sure, stores can make policies, but they have to at least comply with the law. Not too much to ask, really.

  4. #4
    Posted by an unregistered user CT Me / Lawguy's Avatar
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    Re: Collecting ID and Personal Information

    Collection of Personal Information
    Limitations on collection
    11(1) An organization may collect personal information only for
    purposes that are reasonable.
    (2) Where an organization collects personal information, it may do
    so only to the extent that is reasonable for meeting the purposes for
    which the information is collected.

    Copied directly from PIPA

    It is REASONABLE that in the effort to prevent returns fraud, an organization would ask a customer to show ID to process a return.



    No information other then name phone number and address is collected. As previously discussed there is not even a field of entry to add a drivers license or something like that. Your claims are unfounded
    you do have a right to access the information collected by an organization. if you're concerned, when asked, ask to see the screen that they are inputting information into. You have that right and you will see that the only data fields are name address and phone number.

    Also in regards to a receipt, it is absolutely required if the store requests it. this is standard everywhere. Let's pose a scenario. DavidLER has probably tried this. Lets say Walmart sells an item for 29.99 - Canadian Tire has it in their flyer for 18.99 that week. Under your claim of no receipt, you could buy it at the tire, return it at walmart and profit 11 bucks each time.
    Lets say I buy a hammer, and it sits in my toolbox for 6 months, never used. I see the price goes up. I take it back and return it for cash with no receipt, and profit on an item that is 6 months old.

    Proof of purchase is required, to prevent this type of behaviour. it's that simple.
    Despite your claim there is no rule, law or regulation that says receipts are not required and a retailer is obligated to give your money back even if you don't have the receipt.

  5. #5
    Posted by an unregistered user Angry CT Guy's Avatar
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    Re: Collecting ID and Personal Information

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    For opening an account, there are money laundering laws and revenue laws that apply. So, yeah, in that case, the bank is unable to open my account unless I can identify myself. Pretty reasonable, if you think about it for 5 seconds.

    Oh, and for cheques? I deposit cheques into my own account all the time - I don't need to provide ID each tiem. Pretty reasonable, if you think about it. So, no, that example doesn't really work.

    (Unless I go to a cashing service, and have to prove that I'm the one the cheque is made out to - again, all reasonable.)

    But I'm glad that the CT reps are confirming that providing a refund or exchange is a service. That's a step in the right direction.

    And since CT doesn't need ID in order to provide that service (all they need to do is hand over the money!), then CT can't refuse to provide that service, just because a consumer doesn't provide ID.

    Of course, CT might not LIKE having to give people a refund without them showing ID. But too bad for CT- they can't just continue to ignore the laws.

    Thanks for confiming that, CT person!

    And, hey, nobody said consumers get to make the 'rules' for businesses. That's the role of government.

    Sure, stores can make policies, but they have to at least comply with the law. Not too much to ask, really.

    Where are these examples that the store policies are illegal? Almost every single retailer mentions somewhere in their policies that ID may be required....how come there is no mention that this is illegal by any credible source....just you...a promoter of fraud. Do you really think the banks collect and record ID for money laundering?.....it's for fraud
    prevention, clear and simple. And since you, DavidLer support deception, thus fraud, I will doubly ensure that I protect my interests against the likes of you.

  6. #6

    Re: Collecting ID and Personal Information

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    just found an interesting item for you.... in regards to your "illegal to ask for ID claim"
    sorry - who said it was "illegal to ask for ID"?

    and what did you find for walmart?

  7. #7

    Re: Collecting ID and Personal Information

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    There is not a field in the returns computer system to enter birth date or sex.... and etc does not cover anything. Customer information fields are limited to name phone number and address. Period. Nothing else goes into the computer. there's not even a spot to enter it if a clerk wanted to!
    Now, here's one claim that the Crappy People have made before, and which could easily prove.

    They could easily supply us with some documentation to back up this claim.

    For instance, a .pdf of a users maual that shows what fields exist and how they can be populated.

    Or, a screen capture of the display the returns clerks use.

    Yes, it will be interesting to see what proof they offer ...

  8. #8
    Posted by an unregistered user CT Me / Lawguy's Avatar
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    Re: Collecting ID and Personal Information

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Now, here's one claim that the Crappy People have made before, and which could easily prove.

    They could easily supply us with some documentation to back up this claim.

    For instance, a .pdf of a users maual that shows what fields exist and how they can be populated.

    Or, a screen capture of the display the returns clerks use.

    Yes, it will be interesting to see what proof they offer ...
    Here's a likely scenario. If we were to provide any proof, i GUARANTEE one of you haters would come back and say we doctored the screen shot or were lying. You'd NEVER accept that you were wrong. So here's your own test. stroll into Canadian Tire. Go purchase something for 10 bucks. Go grab a coffee at Tim Hortons, come back 20 minutes later and return it. As they are asking for your information, ask them to turn the screen so you can see for yourself.

    I already know the answer. Find it out for yourself


    PS - back to the OP of this thread, receipts are absolutely required to return an item if the retailer chooses so. As discussed and proven previously, returns are not mandated, they are a luxury that most retailers provide. As such, they may set their own rules around those returns as long as they honour warranty terms for defective items. Returns for unused items with documentation is 100% up to the discretion of the retailer. Most have a 90 day policy. They are bound by this policy because they post it.

  9. #9

    Re: Collecting ID and Personal Information

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    PS - back to the OP of this thread, receipts are absolutely required to return an item if the retailer chooses so.
    you seem confused.

    nobody said that receitps aren't needed.

    you should do some fact checking before you post your bs here.

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    As discussed and proven previously, returns are not mandated, they are a luxury that most retailers provide. As such, they may set their own rules around those returns as long as they honour warranty terms for defective items.
    defective items are covered under provincial/territorial legislation and are NOT a luxury, or up to the retailer.

    check out the threads that have provided all the evidence, and not just the wishful thinking of crappy tire.

    Sale of Goods Act

    "Repair Only Warranty" - No Refund, No Exchange

    when you start telling lies like this, is it any wonder that ordinary people don't believe anything you say after a while?

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Returns for unused items with documentation is 100% up to the discretion of the retailer. Most have a 90 day policy. They are bound by this policy because they post it.
    wouldn't that be nice - if crappy tire started actually following their own policies instead of looking for any excuse to wriggle out of it.

    excuses like consumers refusing to let them records information that isn't required to complete a refund.

  10. #10
    Posted by an unregistered user CT Me / Lawguy's Avatar
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    Re: Collecting ID and Personal Information

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    you seem confused.

    nobody said that receitps aren't needed.

    you should do some fact checking before you post your bs here.
    fail
    "Personal identification is not "necessary" for the transaction, and neither is a receipt. Those are just things that Canadian Tire would prefer to have."

    That right there was the second last line from the very first post in this thread. YOUR BS NOT MINE!


    defective items are covered under provincial/territorial legislation and are NOT a luxury, or up to the retailer.

    check out the threads that have provided all the evidence, and not just the wishful thinking of crappy tire.

    Sale of Goods Act

    "Repair Only Warranty" - No Refund, No Exchange

    when you start telling lies like this, is it any wonder that ordinary people don't believe anything you say after a while?



    wouldn't that be nice - if crappy tire started actually following their own policies instead of looking for any excuse to wriggle out of it.

    excuses like consumers refusing to let them records information that isn't required to complete a refund.
    LOL posting to your own threads with your own claims does not count as a verifiable source for retail laws within Canada. First of all when I said luxury, I said for return to stock, not used items, returns ARE a luxury. I did not say thatt for defective items. Check your facts before posting your BS here. Hypocrit

    Defective items must be dealt with by the original seller, ONLY to the original purchaser (except in Quebec where warranty is transferable).
    So aside from your little typo about return to stock vs. defective, you are 100% correct, sort of. defective items are covered. There are rules and regulations that stipulate that the seller of a defective good must take action to remedy the problem. Said rules do not specify how that has to be remedied. So, if the warranty says repair, as long as it goes for repair and returns working (including refurbished parts if needed) - the seller has honoured the warranty, and provided a suitable good as per all applicable laws.

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